penamerican:

“Take all the complexities of translating for the page and compound them with the additional demand that each line be able to come to life when spoken aloud – sounds like a proper challenge!” - Susan BernofskyCome hear some translators and their translations at a joint PEN/hotINK event: Translating the Spoken Word: A Proper Challenge 7pm Saturday, May 31 @ The Lark, 311 West 43rd St., 5th Floor

penamerican:

“Take all the complexities of translating for the page and compound them with the additional demand that each line be able to come to life when spoken aloud – sounds like a proper challenge!” - Susan Bernofsky

Come hear some translators and their translations at a joint PEN/hotINK event:

Translating the Spoken Word: A Proper Challenge
7pm Saturday, May 31 @ The Lark, 311 West 43rd St., 5th Floor

momalibrary:

What are Moticos? from Ray Johsnon’s wikipedia page! —“Johnson began to create small, irregularly shaped works incorporating fragments from popular culture, most notably the Lucky Strikes logo and images from fan magazines of such movie stars as Elvis Presley, James Dean, Marilyn Monroe, and Shirley Temple. In the summer of 1955, he coined a term for these small collages: “moticos”. He carried boxes of moticos around New York, showing them on sidewalks, at cafes, in Grand Central Station and other public places; he asked passersby what they thought of them, and recorded some of their responses. He began mailing collages to friends and strangers, along with a series of manifestos, mimeographed for distribution, including “What is a Moticos?”, excerpts of which were published in an article by John Wilcock in the inaugural issue of the Village Voice.”

momalibrary:

What are Moticos? from Ray Johsnon’s wikipedia page! —“Johnson began to create small, irregularly shaped works incorporating fragments from popular culture, most notably the Lucky Strikes logo and images from fan magazines of such movie stars as Elvis Presley, James Dean, Marilyn Monroe, and Shirley Temple. In the summer of 1955, he coined a term for these small collages: “moticos”. He carried boxes of moticos around New York, showing them on sidewalks, at cafes, in Grand Central Station and other public places; he asked passersby what they thought of them, and recorded some of their responses. He began mailing collages to friends and strangers, along with a series of manifestos, mimeographed for distribution, including “What is a Moticos?”, excerpts of which were published in an article by John Wilcock in the inaugural issue of the Village Voice.”


asymptotejournal:

With a collection including the above three designs, the European Council of Literary Translators’ Associations (CEATL) are trying to prove that a book cover can still be beautiful when the translator’s name is included.

Elizabeth Murray, “Blooming.” Glass mosaic at 59th St-Lexington subway, transferring from R to #5

Elizabeth Murray, “Blooming.” Glass mosaic at 59th St-Lexington subway, transferring from R to #5

Shout-out to our literary translator comrades:

whopays:

Report from a literary translator:

Literary translators are often paid by the word, and the rate hasn’t changed in over 30 years— $0.10-$0.15 cents/word. When we’re not paid by the word, we’re offered token honorariums, or we’re expected to do the work for free as a labor of love.”

James Turrell, “Meeting” ps1

ronpaste:

CÉSAR VALLEJO: THE ‘LOST’ INTERVIEW (TRANS. KENT JOHNSON)